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Writing a review for this type of episode is hard, because all of the “plots” are focused around the same central idea: What happened to Zoë at Miles’ party?  Essentially the story is a collection of point of views from various characters, and they all blend together to make tell one cohesive story.  I’ll hit the recaps of each point of view, then get into more detail about this episode.

Zoë’s POV: Zoë wakes up naked in the Hollingsworth pool house.  She has no memory of the night before, but Frankie shows her pictures on Hastygram that showed Zoë having a wild time at the party.  Rumors are going around that Zoë had sex at the party, but she denies it and remains focused on her Degrassi Sing Off routine with Frankie and Keisha.  However, a video surfaces of her drunk and being taken advantage of by two unknown guys.  The graphic images are too much for her to handle emotionally, leaving her unable to perform her routine.  When questioned by police she tells them she doesn’t remember what happened.  She receives an exam at the health center and discovers she’s been raped.  After the school’s pep rally has been canceled because of the sexual assault, Zoë becomes an outcast as people blame her and think she lied about getting raped.  She’s later confronted by Luke, who confesses to sexually assaulting her and begs her to drop the accusations before it ruins his life.  Zoë keeps quiet until she spots Luke flirting with Frankie; Zoë confronts him in public and reveals he’s the rapist.  Becky comes to Zoë’s side and reveals she has evidence that confirms Luke is guilty.  The next day, Zoë is greeted by Drew, Dallas, Miles, Maya and Tristan.  They all offer to stay with her throughout the day so that she doesn’t have to be alone.

132334-1All of the actors nailed their parts in this episode, led by Ana Golja, whose character was placed in a horrifying position.  Zoë is someone who’s good at putting on a facade, but not even she can pretend as if what happened to her is no big deal.  The more she tries to convince herself that everything will blow over, the more material is leaked, offering up more gory details about a night she can’t remember.  As the episode progresses we see Zoë become more isolated from everyone else; she’s the victim in all of this, yet she’s the one treated like an outsider.  The first scene between her and Luke is brilliant.  By this point she just wants everything to go away, while Luke just wants to avoid getting in trouble.  “No one’s gonna believe you anyway,” Luke says.”  I’m a good Christian guy, I’m a hockey star, I’m on the basketball team; look, you’re gonna ruin my life if you keep this up.”  Zoë delivers the perfect response. “Mine’s already ruined.”

The second and final scene between them is even more brilliant.  Zoë seems content to live a life of shame and misery, hiding the truth about what happened to her, until she sees Luke hitting on Frankie.  It’s an emotional scene as we see Zoë take back the power she’d given to Luke when she agreed earlier not to pursue charges.

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Becky’s POV: At Degrassi, Becky sees pics of Zoë drunk at a party and decides to do a Degrassi TV story about teens and alcohol.  However, she can’t get anyone to admit on camera that they drink.  She discovers a video posted by an anonymous hacker that shows a drunk Zoë being sexually assaulted by unknown guys at the party.  With the help of Imogen and Drew, Becky collects pictures and questions everyone who attended the party.  They receive another anonymous video, this time it’s footage of Miles and Winston carrying Zoë into the pool house.  Becky assumes they’re the ones responsible and shows the video to Simpson, who instead of allowing Becky to air her story, calls the police.  The cops interrogate everyone and determine Miles and Winston didn’t rape Zoë.  Becky feels guilty for falsely accusing Miles and Winston, so she continues her own investigation even though the cops are now involved.  With no leads, the anonymous hacker’s identity is revealed: it’s Grace.  She helps Becky with a plan to discover the identities of those who assaulted Zoë.  Later, Becky and Imogen overhear Luke and his friend freaking out because they think someone knows they’re the ones responsible.  Becky casually asks an unsuspecting Luke for his phone, and finds more graphic pictures and video of Zoë.  She’s conflicted on whether or not to turn her brother in, but she decides to report him once Zoë confronts Luke in front of everyone.

132334-2Becky’s perspective is unique because by the end of the episode, we see there’s multiple layers to how she’s being used and they all have an effect on her.  She starts off as being a shining example of just how naive and disconnected society can be in general.  “Girls have to know if they get drunk, that they’re responsible for their actions,” she says as she pitches her D-TV segment idea about teens an alcohol to Imogen.  Becky’s right when she questions if she’s clueless; she’s initially unaware that everyone she’d interviewed about drinking had lied to her on camera, and Drew has to explain to her that people can black out when they’re drunk.  Once she concludes that Zoë was assaulted, she’s motivated more by a desire to produce a great story than she is to provide any kind of justice for Zoë.

Once Becky falsely accuses Miles and Winston, we see her become vigilant, wanting to make up for her mistake by finding the real culprits.  However, she runs into a dark twist when she discovers her brother is one of the two guys involved in the assault.  It’s devastating news that she can’t accept at first, until she watches one of the videos of Zoë on his phone.  While she seems unsure of what to do, she ends up doing the right thing even though it will destroy her family as she knows it.  “It’s not going to be easy, but it’s important to do what right,” Becky says to Zoë.  Often times the right thing is the hardest thing to do.

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Miles’ POV: After screwing up things with Maya, Miles tries to apologize to her with a gift, one she promptly rejects.   Miles’ love troubles leave him unfocused for the basketball team’s playoff run, so some of his teammates agree to come up with ideas to help him win Maya over.  He and the basketball team sing a song for Maya at the Sing Off, and it works.  However, Miles and Winston find themselves in trouble when they’re accused of sexually assaulting Zoë.  Once they’re vindicated, Miles is back to wanting Maya’s forgiveness after she sees the photos of Miles carrying Zoë at the party.  He tries to get Zoë to straighten things out with Maya, but Zoë blames him for leaving her passed out and unattended at the party.  Miles tries to confront the team about the allegations, but when they blow him off he decides to skip the game.  Afterward, he reconciles with Maya and the two approach Zoë to make sure she’s okay.

132334-3As you would expect from anyone in his position, Miles is so wrapped up in trying to win Maya back that he’s completely oblivious to what’s happening with Zoë.

Why would he care about someone else’s problems when he has his own to worry about?  That’s his mentality, and while it’s easy to judge him harshly for it, acknowledging that we’re all guilty of that fairly regularly is a fact that’s sad, but true (a fitting phrase, given that the second half of this episode was originally titled “Sad But True”).

But like most people, Miles doesn’t react until he receives a wake up call.  While he’s clamoring on to Zoë about trying to win Maya’s forgiveness, Zoë holds him accountable for leaving her alone while passed out. “I did nothing,” he says.

“Exactly,” Zoë says.  “You saw how drunk I was and you did nothing…left me somewhere.”  His diffusion of responsibility at the party no longer holds up when he’s face to face with Zoë, and sees the pain in her eyes.

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It happens to other people.
You say “How sad.”  You say “Poor thing.”
But when it’s you it’s something else; it’s everything.

Paige Michalchuk sang those lyrics after being raped in the season 2 episode, “Shout.”  It’s amazing how relevant those words are to this day, over eleven years later as another Degrassi character is sexually assaulted.  “Unbelievable” is an accurate title for this episode.  It’s unbelievable that people at Degrassi blame Zoë for what happened to her at the party.  It’s unbelievable that no one really seemed concerned with Zoë’s well being.  It’s unbelievable how disturbingly realistic Degrassi was able to portray these two attributes.

132334-6Degrassi hammered two major themes throughout this one-hour episode: “blaming the victim” and the sheer nature of humans to be indifferent toward a situation that doesn’t affect them directly.  Once the pep rally is canceled, rumors begin flying that Zoë is to blame.  They say she slept with guys at the party, regretted it, then cried rape.  Students didn’t question it; nearly all of them had no desire to investigate.  It was accepted as fact, while the truth was lost in the shuffle of people upset because a fun school event was canceled.  It’s weird watching that unfold in this episode, because that mentality perfectly describes how people behave regularly on social media nowadays.  Even if on a less-serious scale, every single day random rumors or half truths pop up.  No one cares enough to do any research on their own, but everyone cares enough to react instantly and harshly, then go about their day as if nothing happened or no one was hurt.

While the general student body blames Zoë for something that’s not (and never will be) her fault, Degrassi’s main characters simply trivialize the situation.  “Why do you even care? You barely know Zoë,” Imogen says as she, Drew and Becky continue investigating Zoë’s assault, even after the police get involved.  Becky is determined to figure out the identities of the two boys, but before that point her primary motivation was to uncover a hard-hitting story so she could be taken seriously as a journalist.  Miles is so consumed with getting Maya back that he doesn’t even try to hide his indifference.  “Do you know what it’s like not knowing what happened to you?” Zoë says.  “Not knowing if someone touched you?”

“Yeah I can’t imagine, but it’s not my fault,” Miles replies.

In another intense scene the student council discusses whether or not to have the pep rally because evidence points to guys on the basketball team being involved.  While Dallas and Drew support the team, Clare is adamant in standing up for Zoë.  “It wasn’t just two guys Drew; everyone at this party let this happen, you let this happen,” Clare says.

The progression of characters coming around and finally understanding the gravity of the situation is slow, but watching the characters moving at different paces toward this is amazing.  They finally reach that point we shouldn’t hesitate to reach, rallying around those who need help instead of showing indifference toward their plight because it doesn’t hit close to home.

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Posted by Kary

28 Comments

  1. nice review. check out my blog as well. i also just got finished interviewing one of the old cast members from the show

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  2. This was an amazing episode. It made me think in a way that I haven’t since Bittersweet Symphony. I started crying and cheering when Zoe tried to beat Luke up, and then Becky held her back and miles took over. Someone else said that this episode really showed how protective miles became of Zoe, eventually. There were 4 lines that really hit me hard:

    1. When Clare accused Drew and everyone else of “letting this happen.”

    2. When Becky had to face probably the hardest decision of her life and look straight at the police officer and say “I have proof that it’s him.”

    3. When Becky begged luke to tell her it’s not true.

    4. And when we saw Zoe FINALLY really really break down and cry “isn’t there anything else I can do?”

    I don’t know, I’m kind of emotional and stuff like that hits me hard. This episode was simply amazing. I felt bad (even more so, in a way than for Zoe) for Becky. My sympathies really lie with Becky. I know that in the beginning, she “helped” for the wrong reasons, to benefit herself. But she really came around. And the way that this all went down was just brilliant and twisted. The way she never suspected luke and her trusting nature just made the whole situation even more sad. The only thing I disliked was the ending. I really hope this story and it’s effects don’t just disappear after this episode. Yes I know about the ” the things that happen in episode will effect characters throughout the season” tweet that was sent out. But from what it looks like in next weeks promo, it doesn’t seem like it at all. I could be wrong, who knows? But who really cares about Jenna and Connor and the prom right NOW? And maya thinks he reason zig is homeless is because of her? Really? I really hope this at least gets talked about next week. And I really really hope this isn’t an excuse for luke to get blackholed.
    And Leo. Anyone have any ideas about what’s gonna happen with Leo? I really hope neither, luke nor Leo gets blackholed. Because based on degrassi’s history, one of two things can happen: either they get blackholed, or they come back with a plot that makes absolutely no sense. Such as 2 episodes later, luke is out of jail and owns a horse ranch. Just sayin’. Any thoughts guys?

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    1. I strongly agree with all of your earlier points, so I just want to comment about the last few things.

      For the next episode, I don’t think Maya genuinely believes she caused Zig’s homelessness. I could be wrong, but my guess is that her mindset is “oh man, i’ve been blowing him off while he’s been in this bad situation.” Her phrasing leads Tristan and Zoe to make those remarks, but it’s not actually what she meant. That’s my guess, mainly because I’m trusting that they will (hopefully) not suddenly make Maya sound extremely self-centered and dumb.

      As for Leo…honestly, how else could they make use of his character? He got sent back to France and he’s been told never to contact Alli again. From a storyline standpoint, the writers have made it clear to us that Alii is done with Leo forever. If he was a “main character,” I would consider that being blackholed, but he was just a plot-centric villain. That conflict is essentially over, so I don’t think Leo will be back at all. Similar to how Bobby and Vince have disappeared for good.

      Luke has a slightly better chance of coming back, but it definitely won’t be any time soon. I agree, this would be fantastic for getting him out of his character slump and giving him some good fallout material, but Luke’s reached a villainous status that will make it VERY difficult to reasonably get any roles that don’t involve him just being an asshole again. They could go the redemption route with him, but that’s much easier when the audience is willing to say “maybe theres some good in him, let’s see him turn his life around.” At this point, I don’t think there’s any shred of redemption left for him in the eyes of the Degrassi fandom. So I doubt he’ll return, but if he ever does, he’s just going to continue playing the villain.

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  3. A good episode, but like others noted on the “preview” post, it felt too quickly and happily wrapped up. I feel that Degrassi, in spite of tackling some sensitive topics over the past few seasons, is becoming too saccharine. Heavy stories are wrapped up in an episode or two, complete with an upbeat pop song, a group of smiling faces, and hugs and rainbows. When Paige decided to see Ms. Sauve after the events of “Shout”, there was a hopeful atmosphere in that last scene, but it wasn’t “happy”. I guess because of the public nature of this event, Zoe had more people sticking up for her and ready to welcome her back with open arms by the end of the episode (whereas Paige’s rape wasn’t known about by everyone), but the way ALL of the characters are friendly with one another and are always hanging out together now seems unrealistic. I feel that the insular nature of past characters was far more realistic than it is, now. Or maybe that’s what high schools are like in the age of social media, where everyone is “friends” with each other? It’s as if no character can have their own group of friends, anymore.

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    1. Have you ever seen the first series? It was 30 min episodes! It is the nature of the After School Special genre! Dragging it out makes it into a soap opera.

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  4. I actually wasn’t too happy with this episode. I found it a bit ridiculous. Honestly, Becky must be extremely stupid if she thought she could show the videos of Zoe to the whole school. I mean really wtf. I know she is a high school kid but most people, even at that age, know not to air someone’s rape/assault video.
    Even when the police became involved it was “false accusations” for accusing Miles’ and Winston but in the real world those cops better be investigating not just blowing it off because Becky accused the wrong guys. They’d be tracing those videos back to someone and questioning the owner (the girl from the rubber room).They would be questioning the party-goers and investigating the basketball team (since the jacket was in the video).
    I still can’t believe Zoe let her friend say it was the same as the Drew situation- Zoe didn’t cry rape, her mom did- the situation is completely different. Drew was a mistake. A regret. But even Zoe was honest about it being consensual.
    I find it highly unlikely that any school anywhere would let students print a bunch of pictures of a drunk, half-naked classmate and hang them on the wall. Those kids are not cops and they had no business investigating Zoe’s situation. Would you want people posting pics like that of you on your school wall? Even though their goal was to help her, I still find this completely unbelievable and stupid.
    There should have been a lot less student involvement and a lot more police involvement. In the end, I am very glad that Becky stood up for Zoe. It was the right thing to do. After being a complete friggin’ moron by trying to show the video to the entire school it was basically the only good thing Becky did.
    Maybe I’m just too old to watch this show anymore but this episode was just too unbelievably dumb for me to enjoy it very much.

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    1. I hope you realize this was based off a real case from two years ago and this is almost exactly how it happened. And I dont think Becky was gonna show the assault video, just talk about the topic and how easy it happens. This is actually one of the most real plots they have done in a long time and it happens far too much

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      1. Even though the story may have been loosely based on the Steubenville case, it’s a stretch to say this is almost exactly how it happened. Most if not all of what Kait just complained about has to do with Degrassi storytelling issues, not what happened in that case. I don’t recall a student reporter being the one to blow open the case and get the cops involved. Plus, this isn’t a small town and there weren’t a bunch of adults trying to cover it up- it’s Toronto, and the principal is the one who called the cops, knowing full well that one of the accused was the son of the guy running for mayor… But of course, this being Degrassi and not a Steubenville documentary, having Mr. Simpson participate in a cover-up would be ludicrous… Now if The Shep was still around, on the other hand…

        Anyway, Becky WAS being an idiot. Even if she wasn’t going to show the assault video, she obviously couldn’t do a story on the recent assault of a student without talking to the victim- that’s completely disrespectful and inappropriate. I also can’t believe neither Drew or Imogen wouldn’t think, “Gee, maybe we should talk to Zoe about this.” We know these characters- they aren’t the brightest, but they aren’t complete morons. So yeah, while the episode was good and the topic is worthy, it wasn’t executed perfectly.

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      2. What he said had nothing to do with its story telling “issues”. He complained about the lack of tracing from police and naive children but the real case was their was a real hacker and this same exact situation of people posting pictures and videos.

        The part you don’t seem to understand was the Beckys plot was virtue to the episode to see the story from an innocent girls point of view, it wasn’t suppose to be looked at as her being a detective.

        As far as the whole story on Zoe goes, the whole school had been seeing and watching the videos already. If anything it would have helped zoe clear her name and prevented more actions like it. Also it comes down to the safty and actions for all students. If there were molesters running around my school I would sure as hell want to know about it.

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      3. Based of a real case+ yes. Almost exactly how it happened=no. I can’t believe anyone would think that.
        The real case involved an intoxicated girl being digitally raped by football players after a party. The real case involved pictures and videos of the incident being shown and discussed on social media sites.
        The real case, as far as I’m aware, did NOT involve some dumb, innocent high school girl thinking it was totally okay to use the photos and videos as an alcohol awareness PSA for the entire high school. Who would ever think that is okay!? Only a fictional character like Becky would ever think that was acceptable.
        Also, the Steubenville rape case involved a lot more police involvement and a lot less student-detective work. The police in the real case collected a ton of evidence by looking at social media sites, confiscating phones, checking texts records, etc.
        Nowhere in my research did I see anything about students wanting to air a school-wide PSA using the pictures or videos from the incident. I also didn’t see any mention of students lining an entire wall with disturbing rape/assault pictures and trying to solve the case on their own. That part seems to be just degrassi storytelling and it is bs.
        From what I’ve read about the real case, it is a really disturbing situation. Apparently, one of the guys who digitally raped her later said he should’ve really raped her since everyone thinks he did anyway. That is a totally messed up way of thinking because it shows that the guy didn’t even view his actions as rape and it would be great if degrassi continues this storyline to include that. I could totally see Luke saying something like that- his character is horrible.
        Like others have said, degrassi should not end a plot just because one episode is over. Everyone is smiling in the end of the episode because the guys got caught but that does not mean justice was served. Everyone should not be happy yet. This was a horrible event and we should see the aftermath of it for awhile, at least from Zoe and Becky. I think we should see what happens to Luke. I don’t want him to just disappear now.

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      4. kait: i dont know if you replied without seeing my follow up comment because it doesnt look like you did? so i am just gonna say see that; if not look at Kary’s post on his more thoughts page cause he explains it more than I do especially about the police involvement and Becky plot

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  5. Anyone else like how they are secretly sliding in support characters like Frankie and Grace into the scene and giving them character before they are (hopefully) inducted into the “main” cast. It is a good way for us to learn what they are like before we can say what is unlike them when they get a main plot. Also gives us a real student perspective on what we see them as and what really is going on in their real life.

    Also I hope luke ISNT gone. This was such a great role for him and so many ways between him and his family and his religion they could spin this! Someone fresh for them to use!

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    1. Sara Waisglass (Frankie) and Nikki Gould (Grace) are already in the main cast. They receive star billing for every episode they’re in just like all the other regulars. Now the parents like Clare’s mom, Alli’s mom and dad, even Mr. Hollingsworth are all credited as “guest stars.”

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      1. I dont think that techincally means they are in the “main” cast per say yet. Only reason i say this is because i remember back in season 7 when Samantha wasn’t in the intro (well credited in the intro, she was in the main backdrop of the logo) but for the episodes she was in she would get a star bill at the beginning of each episode lol but I dont know maybe i am putting too much thought into this!!!

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  6. While I do agree that the episode was compelling, there is a key point that you seem to have confused or I have. When Zoe went to the Dr. and asked if she was raped the Dr. told her that intercourse was unlikely, but there was vaginal trauma and insertion. What does that mean? Isn’t insertion intercourse? Was she raped or just molested? I don’t think it was completely clear since the Dr. didn’t say for sure one way or another. Both of these are horrible, but for me, the actual events of that night still don’t seem clear.

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    1. A graphic, but blunt answer to your question about the vaginal trauma and insertion w/o intercourse would be that one (or possibly both) of the guys fingered Zoë.

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      1. That’s why I used the term molested because that’s what I figured happened. If that’s the case then Zoe was assaulted, but not raped. It is still horrible and devastating, but I think it is important to make that distinction. It also means the boys responsible may not get in as much trouble as they could’ve if they had raped her. It is slightly unrealistic to think 2 boys would molest her, but not take it any further, but that’s just my opinion.

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      2. Well, at least now there won’t be a bunch of “Zoe pragnate????” posts all over the internet.

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    2. Dorien Belgium March 13, 2014 at 5:05 am

      It is rape, if a finger, penis or vibrator. Against your will is inserted into your mouth, vagina or anus, then it is considered rape. So that how it is seen here in belgium. Sorry for my bad english, but I hope you understand.

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  7. Also, it annoyed me when the police were called and Zoe was questioned. It felt like the other characters were making all her decisions for her. She was already powerless and then she didn’t even have a choice in reporting her assault and they wanted to shut down school functions because of it, also Becky wanted to pursue the story w/o even informing Zoe or getting her consent, which I highly doubt would have ever been an option. Every single character made choices that affected Zoe but didn’t even once bother to see how she was doing until the very end. That really disturbed me.

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    1. So true. It’s assumed that everyone wants to press charges, but that’s not always the case. As a victim, she deserved to have some control over the situation. It was ridiculous that Becky and others who don’t know Zoe led an entire investigation and barely involved Zoe herself. She was powerless at the party and continued to be powerless afterward. I felt so bad for her character as I watched everyone around her try to take control of that. Also, it was disturbing to see the student council posting those pictures of Zoe all over the wall. Why would you ever do that?

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  8. Hey Kary, do you think this is the last time we’ll see Luke? I’m happy that this is the first time in Degrassi history that a rape plot finally sees justice in the end (i.e. with the rapist being caught and taken to jail). While it was true that it happened to Dean he basically got off scot-free. I want to see what happens to Luke to see if Becky stands against him in trial and just so we can see how he’d try to claim his innocence or something of the matter. It would be sad for him to leave and for them to hand-wave the aftermath of what happened to Zoe and I hope they drag this part of her out instead of just cutting it off here as the writers have done with some Degrassi plots in the past.

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  9. Overall this was a pretty good episode, but there were some things that bugged me. I’ll just go with the one that hasn’t been brought up yet: the little guilt trip Miles is sent through… because really, as misguided as it might have been, he did try to help. He was also extremely wasted, so how much can one really expect from the guy? He wasn’t obligated to babysit his drunken ex. Most teens are not going to call the cops as soon as someone passes out. He was trying to keep her safe by carrying her to the pool house. I don’t think it crossed his mind that giving a drunken girl some privacy would make her an easier rape target. So I don’t think it’s fair to say that he “let” this happen; frankly, in this situation, I don’t think it’s fair to say anyone “let” this happen. In cases like this, when the situation was so unclear, blame should not be shifted around between victims and bystanders- it should lie on the perpetrators of the crime.

    Blaming innocent people for not doing enough isn’t much better than victim blaming, in my opinion. After all, it’s not like he walked in on her being assaulted and left her there. If you want to blame people for not doing enough- how about her “friend” Frankie? She was there, she saw how drunk Zoe was, and she didn’t seem as drunk as most of the people at that party- so why does anyone blame people like Miles and Drew, who were either too out of it or too unaware to notice what was going on, before blaming people like Frankie? Really, now that I think about it, everything about that girl rubbed me the wrong way this episode.

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    1. Miles doing nothing once again indicates how young and immature he is. If you’re a guy, and you see a girl is blacked out and vulnerable, especially if you are the host, it becomes your responsibility as a guy to babysit her until she gets home safely. Miles sees the world where men and women are treated equally. Unfortunately, this is not the case. Cases where high school girls are exploited while in inebriated states continue partly because there aren’t any males around who act like men. Notice how Drew takes what happened personally? It’s because he’s grown up a bit and realizes that his treatment of Zoe was a catalyst.

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    2. I noticed that Miles is getting attacked for not doing more, even though he and Winston did a lot more than anyone at that party did. Unfortunately neither of them thought that there was anyone at that party that would do what Luke and his accomplice did. Some people, especially teens, are naive about that sort of thing and in their minds they did help her instead of leaving her out there on display. Also, Miles’ sister bugs me quite a bit, trying to act like she’s so much better than her brother and that she’s such a good friend to Zoe. But she’s neither of those things. She doesn’t acknowledged she was at that party and drinking, but instead was willing to let Miles take the blame for everything as if she was innocently minding her own business.

      Then later she just abandoned Zoe like that in the parking lot and I felt it was just so cruel. I can understand that it might be tough to be in Frankie’s position, given that some people in the school thought sports and a prep rally were more important and bullying could come into play, but it wasn’t anywhere near the level Zoe was at and I guess it was hard for her to see it from Zoe’s point of view. It also goes to show that some people have no issues recording and taking pictures of something, like Frankie did, instead of getting involved whether it’s helping the person themselves or calling the police to help. A real friend would’ve kept an eye on her or called for reinforcement to get Zoe to get home. Miles has gained some maturity out of this episode, but I’m not sure where Frankie’s lies yet,

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  10. I get what you mean about Frankie. I mean she is still a freshman though.
    She seems really wishy washy, like she doesn’t know what she wants. Does anyone know if Frankie is a regular character/main cast or just a supporting character? Also does anyone else think that something might have already been going on with Becky and Luke? Because I was just watching Power to the People (I think that’s the episodes title), where Imogen doesn’t wear a bra to school, and luke makes that gross comment. If you watch Becky (Sarah’s acting) really closely, it almost looks like this isn’t the first time Luke’s acted like that. It almost seems like Becky has seen this kind of behavioral “change” (in Becky’s opinion) only RECENTLY, and Becky just had to call him out this time. I hope I’m making sense. What I mean to say is, it seems like Becky’s been “holding it” in her to reprimand luke, but she hasn’t had the guts to, until that moment. Which makes me think that maybe Becky has noticed this new innapproppriate behavior of her brothers, and perhaps they’ve gotten into fights about it at home, and Becky has started to see her brother for what he really is, and she was in denial till the end of the episode. And then at the end of the episode, all her worst fears were confirmed. I hope I’m making sense, but something about Becky’s facial expression in that scene made me feel like that wasn’t the first time she’s experienced her brother’s grossness.

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  11. I have to disagree with this review. On its own, the episode is good. I just struggle with a few aspects for wider storytelling. First, Zoe has been a bitch almost her entire run. In the context of a television show, I don’t think it was wise to take a “villain” and have the audience sympathize with her. Apparently, no one else had an issue with this, but I did. I think Maya would have been a better candidate. Secondly, I didn’t like that Luke has been MIA forever and suddenly, he returns just to be the bad guy. I would have liked to see him return previously, and maybe see “hints” for this kind of behavior from him. And, what was with the giant board with all the pictures. That seemed so CSI to me. Just goofy.

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  12. @Daleylife I think that is exactly why they chose Zoe to be the victim of the assault, because she is not liked very much at school and not a favorite character of many. I think they were trying to show that even though someone may not be liked very well, that no one deserves to be taken advantage of. It’s honestly kind of ignorant to say that the audience shouldn’t have sympathized with her because she is the “villain” (she is not a villain btw, she’s not evil just kind of annoying and a bad friend). Anyone that has been assaulted deserves sympathy.

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